The small dot in this image may be the first time to see an satellite being processed

The small dot in this image may be the first time to see an exo-satellite being processed. The new telescope image may provide the first view of a satellite forming outside the solar system.

A potentially dusty material lunar maker disk. Orbiting a small exoplanet about 370 light-years from Earth. A report published online on July 22 in The Astrophysical Journal Letters stated that the Jupiter-like world is surrounded by enough material to form up to 2.5 satellites of the Earth. Observations of this system can provide new perspectives on how planets and moons are born around young stars.

ALMA observed two planets in July 2019, named PDS 70b and 70c, orbiting the star PDS 70. Unlike most other known exoplanets, these two Jupiter planets are still forming, devouring material from the disk. Gas and dust revolve around the star (SN: 7/2/18). During this formation process, the planet is expected to wrap itself in its own debris disk, which controls how the planet accumulates in matter and forms satellites. The new telescope image may provide the first view of a satellite forming outside the solar system. A potentially dusty material lunar maker disk. Orbiting a small exoplanet about 370 light-years from Earth. A report published online on July 22 in The Astrophysical Journal Letters stated that the Jupiter-like world is surrounded by enough material to form up to 2.5 satellites of the Earth. Observations of this system can provide new perspectives on how planets and moons are born around young stars. ALMA observed two planets in July 2019, named PDS 70b and 70c, orbiting the star PDS 70. Unlike most other known exoplanets, these two Jupiter planets are still forming, devouring material from the disk. Gas and dust revolve around the star (SN: 7/2/18). During this formation process, the planet is expected to wrap itself in its own debris disk, which controls how the planet accumulates in matter and forms satellites.

Near PDS 70c, ALMA detected a dust disk as wide as the Earth's orbit around the sun. Since previously reported sightings of extrasolar satellites are still controversial, new observations provide some of the best evidence that planets orbiting other stars have satellites (SN: 4/30/19).

Unlike PDS 70c, 70b does not seem to form a lunar disk. This may be because its orbit is narrower than PDS 70c, which is almost as far away from its star as Pluto is from the sun. This brings PDS 70c closer to the outer debris disk surrounding the star.

“C is getting all the material from the outer disk, and b is starving,” said Jaehan Bae, an astrophysicist at the Carnegie Institute of Science in Washington, DC, co-author of the study.

“In the past, there must be some material on the [record] of b, and it may have formed a satellite,” Pei said. But in order to produce new images, ALMA studied the wavelength of light emitted by dust particles the size of sand, rather than large objects, so these satellites are invisible.